Sequim Bay

August 8, 2019 – When I woke up at 4 am I looked at the weather forecast and there was a small craft advisory in effect, a gale warning in effect, and big winds and gusts in the forecast. Not knowing how reliable that forecast was I honored it and decided I would not paddle the final SSJF segment today, despite how calm it seemed to be.

We struck camp and headed east back to friends Kris and Ken’s place in Sequim. After we got to their place it was still calm so I decided it was time to paddle the protected Sequim Bay. I was excited to explore the bay and get back on the water today into something without a gale or small craft warning.

After dropping off Uncle Sid and Gaston at Kris and Ken’s I drove to Port Williams, a park about a mile north of Sequim Bay with a nice ramp. I loaded and launched and paddled into and then around then entire Sequim Bay and back to Port Williams. It was a sweet and easy little 12-mile pleasure paddle. Kind of weird to see paddling 12 miles as little and easy but that is what paddling over 700 miles in a couple of months will do to a person. When I got back to Port Williams, I loaded BABS onto the Saab, loaded all my gear, and headed back to Kris and Ken’s place.

Back at Kris and Ken’s, after a much needed shower, we went out for some of the best Chinese food I have eaten. Even better, there were enough leftovers for me to take with me tomorrow on my paddle of the final stretch of the Strait of San Juan de Fuca. Since the big hazardous forecast for this stretch today never materialized, when I wake up tomorrow, if the actual conditions do not match the forecast, I am paddling from Port Angeles to Cline Spit. If it’s blowing, I’ll take the day off.

Tonight, Kris said the forecast for winds is usually spot on. That means today someone at NOAA was asleep at the wheel. I wouldn’t be heartbroken if the forecast for big winds tomorrow is wrong because then I can enjoyably finish out the Strait of San Juan de Fuca segment of this journey.

Written by

kyleenaustin

I am passionate about outdoor exploration. In the recent years I have discovered how much more I can experience from a kayak. I am a professional musician and own a dairy where we produce raw milk, butter and cheeses. My son tells me I have "too much on my plate". He is correct, but I wouldn't live life any other way.

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